“There is no original past to redeem: there is the void.” Uncountry is an invitation to that void, and Friedland serves as dream guide through this blend of the personal, political, and stunningly poetic. — Lily Hoang

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In Muriel Leung’s Bone Confetti, the poet writes, “The body, a violin that someone is always fingering.” I am haunted by this line and all that is hidden within the spaces in between. I am haunted by this book as a work of silence, as pain, as loss, as the book written as necessity. It is a beautiful, difficult and unresolved work of art. Such is poetry. Such is life.

Truong Tran

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Fitzgerald’s poetics sets out to rethread fragmented personal experience, family lore, socio-cultural prohibitions and allowances, in order to bear down on staid notions of labor and the working body. What’s achieved is a historical perspective that has both sweep and depth.- Rodrigo Toscano
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Tupelo Quarterly reviews I Was Not Born

When art and pain collide, a perfectly complicated and beautiful book sometimes emerges. Such is Julia Cohen’s I WAS NOT BORN, her third and latest work. It is a lifetime achievement and commingles poetry, transcripts of therapy sessions, letters, meditations, and text messages (all of which are poetry really) with a tremendous psychological and emotional impact.   Read the rest at Tupelo...

Review of Between Grammars at Entropy

Vogel describes her early experiences of reading and writing as “a bridging between [her] voice and [her] body,” as a kind of communion. “Language slowed the world for me,” she recalls, “it gave me a sense of tactility, a skin to encase my thinking.” Vogel’s visceral experience of language is palpable in Between Grammars; there is a sense of tactility ever-present. Beyond the philosophical exploration, reading this book is as much a sensory experience as an intellectual one, the text shot through with light, sound, and touch.   Read the rest at...

Rain Taxi review of The Ghost In Us Was Multiplying

Armendinger is a master at using fragmented language with precise purpose. His poems experiment with language and form—this collection includes a poem delivered in the form of an instant messenger conversation, and a poem placed as a footnote within another poem—but never read as mere avant-garde posturing. Instead, Armendinger again and again finds new ways to use defamiliarized language to access the unsayable. It’s a rare and wonderful thing to find a poet who can so powerfully, vividly, and gracefully engage with the problems of language and the world. The Ghost In Us Was Multiplying is a vital book: experimental, substantial, fragmented, unified, unsettled, and unsettling, Armendinger’s work is key reading for all those who care about what our broken words can do. Read the rest at Rain...

Front Porch reviews The University of Pennsylvania

Rachel Gray reviews Caren Beilin’s The University of Pennsylvania at Front Porch: Beilin creates a mixture of striking and strange imagery. In the The University of Pennsylvania, kidding is “unsexual, sisternal,” the sunset has “ripe red horns,” cum is a serum all the way from London, and the children of doctors sniff cocaine—or perhaps gelatin. Never before had I considered the similarity between violet and violent, but this book asks its readers to ponder the relationship between the two. Read the rest at Front...

Chicago Tribune glowing review of Her 37th Year

Kathleen Rooney reviews Suzanne Scanlon’s Her 37th Year, An Index, in the Chicago Tribune. Here’s a sample: One of the many brilliant aspects of this book is that the form permits Scanlon to offer a built-in answer. For an index is a guide, an imposition of a pattern on something that does not necessarily suggest that pattern, in this case, the life of Scanlon’s protagonist, who is attempting to catalog her life so far: attending university, being in a mental institution, having affairs, getting married, giving birth to a child and so on. This structure lets Scanlon capitalize on the by-turns fun, wry and melancholy juxtapositions of entries in an index due to the happy accidents of alphabetical order. In this way, she emphasizes how such indices can lead to inadvertent insights merely by letting a reader see one alphabetical name or phrase preceding or following another. Read the rest at the Chicago Tribune. (Warning: you’ll have to...

Two Poems by Chloe Garcia Roberts at Boston Review

Read “Once When Light Returned After a Blackout, I Found My Face Pressed Into a Wall Asking for Help” and “Outside My Window a Tree Is Singing Flowers So I Cannot Sleep, I Cannot Sleep” at the Boston Review.  Chloe Garcia Roberts’ debut book of poetry, The Reveal, will be published by Noemi Press this...

Rain Taxi review of Starlight in Two Million

Amy Catanzano’s Starlight in Two Million: A Neo-Scientific Novella is a mind-full, mine-filled, field of literary, aesthetic, scientific, and imaginative constructs that take forms as collage, cultural allegory, anti-war expression, epistolary conversation, and song-of-joy-in-risk-taking, to list merely a few. Read the rest at Rain...